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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 June 7, 1937 No. 



LATE CABLES. . 



India second official estimate of the 
current wheat crop placed at 359,259,000 bush- 
els as against comparable 1936 estimate revised 
to 349,813,000 bushels and final 1936 figure 
of 352,240,000 bushels. Acreage reported at 
32,720,000 as compared with 33,494,000 acres 
last year. (Director of Statistics, Calcutta, 
India. ) 

India current flaxseed crop estimated at 
6,720,000 bushels from 3,594,000 acres as against 
revised estimates for 1936 of 15,520,000 bushels 
from 3,457,000 acres. (Director of Statistics, 
Calcutta, India.) 



310 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 23 



Canadian crop conditions 

According to a telegram just -rece ived from the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics at Ottawa, Canada, agricultural operations throughout the 
Dominion have been retarded by cool weather and abundant rainfall, with 
the exception of certain parts of the Prairie Provinces where the spring 
opened earlier than usual. Throughout eastern Canada, seeding has been 
greatly delayed because of wet fields, and much seeding remains to be 
done. Meadows and pastures in this region are in good condition, par- 
ticularly in the Maritime Provinces. 

In the Prairie Provinces wheat seeding is virtually completed, and 
sowing of coarse grains is well advanced except in southern Saskatchewan, 
where sowing has been delayed through lack of rainfall . Light rainfall 
improved the prospects in southern Alberta during the past week. Scant 
supplies of moisture in that area and southern Saskatchewan, however, are 
causing concern, and considerable acreage in these regions will be lost 
if substantial rains are delayed much longer. 

Br iti s h wheat q uota payments suspended 

Effective April 18. 1937, the British Minister of Agriculture 
and Fisheries, on the recommendation of the Wheat Commission, relieved 
millers and importers of flour of the liability to make quota payments 
under the Wheat Act. These payments had been used to subsidize British 
wheat growers for the purpose of maintaining the price of domestic wheat 
at approximately 10 shillings per hundredweight ($1.32 per bushel) on an 
annual quantity not to exceed 50,000,000 bushels. As reported in "Foreign 
Crops and Markets" of June 1, it is proposed to increase the quantity on 
which such payments will be made in the future to approximately 67,000,000 
bushels; and a bill providing for this has been introduced. 

The suspension of the liability of millers and importers to make 
quota payments does not imply that no more deficiency payments will be 
made to registered growers of home-grown mil lab le wheat. The order is 
based on a calculation that the surplus in the wheat fund at the begin- 
ning of the current crop year, together with quota payments that have 
accrued since that time, will be sufficient to provide for the deficiency 
payments in respect to the current crop year. It should be noted that 
certificates lodged with the Wheat Commission by registered growers dur- 
ing the period August 1, 1936, to April 9, 1937, cover sales of only 
33,085,000 bushels of millable wheat compared with 51,757,000 bushels 
in the corresponding period of the previous crop year. 

The following table shows the' variations in the rate of quota 
payments made by millers and importers since the Wheat Act came into 



June 7, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



311 



operation in 1933. It is interesting that the rate has been reduced in 
recent months as world wheat prices approached the minimum price guaran- 
teed British growers. 

Date on which specified quota Rate of quota payment by 

payment came into operation flour millers and importers 

Cents per 100 pounds a/ 



June 19, 1933 


14.53 


October 30, 1932 


16.12 


August 2, 1933 


. 27.87 


November 5, 1933 


39.07 


August 12, 1934 


36.45 


March 17, 1935 


38.57 


September 29, 1935 


35.10 


November 3, 1935 


30 . 73 


February 23, 1936 


26.72 


Augast S, 1936 


17.95 


November 1, 1936 


8.73 


January 27, 1937 


4,37 


April 18, 1937 


Suspended. 



a/ Conversions made at rates of exchange existing on dates listed. 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 
Cuban pineapple crop large 



The yield of export pineapples (Spanish Red) in Cuba is variously 
estimated at from 900,000 crates to 1,400,000 crates from plantings of 
from 5,500 to 6,500 acres, according to a. communication from Harold S. 
Tewell , American Consul at Habana. Most of the pineapples are shipped 
to the United States for consumption as fresh fruit. During 1935, 
898,043 crates were exported to the United States, of which 755,916 went 
forward during the 3-month period. April to June, and 142,127 daring the 
remaining 9 months of the year. In addition, about 115 cars (92,300 
dozen) of bulk pineapples are reported to have been shipped to canneries 
in Canada. Indications are that exports during 1937 will amount to 
around 1,000,000 crates and 135 carloads in balk. Should heavy rains 
occur in June, shipments will decline. 

Good apple cr op indicated in Nova Scotia 

Apple trees had a moderately heavy bloom in Nova Scotia, this 
season, according to a communication from Robert Jakes, 3d, American 
Vice- Consul at Yarmouth, practically all growers had completed their 
first spray application by the second week in May under almost ideal 
weather conditions. As a result of the care orchard! sts are giving 
their trees, scab is expected to be less prevalent than usual. 



312 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 23 



Cuban avocado crop prospects satisfactory- 
Weather conditions in Cuba have "been satisfactory so far for the 
growing avocado crop and, "barring storms of sufficient intensity to knock 
fruit from the trees, a yield equal to that of 1936 is anticipated, accord- 
ing to a communication from Harold S. Te.wel'l, American Consul at Habana. 
Exports of avocados to the United States in 1936 amounted to 9,844,089 
pounds compared with 9,376,387 pounds in 1935. 

Exports of avocados from Cuba are limited "by agreement with the 
United States to the 4-month period, June to September. Exports during 
these months in 1937 are expected to "be about the same as last year. 
The crop is maturing slowly, and it is reported that only a small quantity 
of fruit will be ripe enough for shipment during the first half of June. 
Exports in June 1936 totaled 843,024 pounds compared with 317,608 pounds 
in June 1935. 

Yu goslavian prune crop expected to be smal l 

Cold, rainy weather during blossoming time resulted in a very 
poor set of fruit on prune trees in the Danube Basin, particularly in 

Yugoslavia, according to a. communication from the Belgrade office of 

the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Only about one-fifth of a, normal 

crop is expected in the important prune-producing regions. Yugoslavian 

prunes offer the chief competition met by pacific Coast prunes in the 
Eur op e an m arke t . 



PRUNES, (DRIED) 



Estimated production, average 1929-34, 
annual 1935 and 1936 





: Average 
1929-34 Inc. 


j 1935 


1935 
_ Preliminary 
Short tons 

42,000 
9,000 

3/ 
8,000 




Short tons 

13,533 
1,268 
261 
7,000 


: Short tons 

11,143 
11,015 
5,850 
5,000 




27,112 


33,013 


59,000 


212,850 


297,600 


177,200 


239,962 


330,618 I 


236,200 



Paris office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

l/ Figures represent exports. 2/ California, Oregon, and Washington. 
3/ Negligible . 



June 7, 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 313 



COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 

May 28, with compar i son s 

, ; 1957" 

Growth I April . May 

; 9 : 16 : 23 , 30 : 7 ; 14 ,a/~20 ■ 2 8 

• Cents : Cents [ Cents : Cents : Cents -C ents - Cents [ C ents 
American - ! [ [ j ; : [ [ 

Middling "16.04 [15.50 115.42 [14,88 -15.32 :14.65 jlS.Ol [15.15 

Low Middling '14.51 -13.77 [13.87 [13.53[13.78 [13.10 jl3.47 113.61 

Egyptian (Fully Good Fair) j j ; : | : : : 

Sakellaridis |25.13 :24.68 [24.49 123.08 [23.76 :22 .73 :22. 75 :23.80 

Uppers [19.18 [18.66 [20.17 ;19.04 [20.14 [19.34 [19.87 [20.15 

Brazilian (Fair) - : i : [ : [ [ [ 

Ceara -14.72 :13.97 114.08 [13.54:13.99 [13.31 [13. 67 [13.81 

Sao Paulo [15. 64 [14.89 : .15.00 [14.46 [14.91 [14.24 [14. 60 [14.74 

East Indian - 

Broach (Fully Good) :12. 74 :i2. 39 [12.45 [12.14 [12.53 :12. 08 '12. 33 :12. 35 

C P. Oomraitfo. 1, Superfine :12. 84 :12. 50 112.56 [12.24 [12.63 [12.18 [l2. 44 :12. 45 

Sind (Fully Good) [11.78 ill. 68 ill. 81 [11.50 [11.89 [11.64 [ - [ - 

Peruvian (Good) [ [ [ : i : [ [ 

Tangais '. 120.22 [19.50 119. 64 [19.10 [19.54 ;18. 87 : - [ - 



Converted at current exchange rate. 

a/ Thursday prices, due to holiday Friday. 



BUTTER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, and London, 

June 3, 1957, with c omp arisons 

' . 1936 ' 193 7 



Market and description 


June 4 


May 27 


June 3 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




28.2 


31.0 


31.2 




30.0 


33,0 


35.0 


Copenhagen, official quotation. 


19.6 


19.5 


19.4 


London : 










25.1 


25.2 


25.1 




23.8 


23.8 


24.3 




22.6 


23.1 


23.4 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange. 



314 



Foreign Crops and Markets' 



Vol. 34, No. 23 



BUTTER: New Zealand grading, 1936-37 season to May 21, 



with comparisons 


Date 


J 1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Week ended 


; i,uuu pounds 


J. , uuu pouncis 


x , uuu pounds 


August 1 to February 26... 




OAO 'yQA 


Cj\J L k , UO ( 


March 5.. 


O,t32o 


tj no a 


ft C\i\A 
D , UD^t 


12 




7 9^2 


8 00? 


1 9 






7 67P 


do 


b , DDL) 


! ^ AAC\ < 


P. ^DP 
D f OoO 


March total 


i 24^752 


29,512 


30,066 


APrlX d 


....... D , (Lei 


£ AAfl 
D , <±*±U 




9 


• 5 , 768 


5,600 


6,406 


16 


■ 4,558 


5,656 


6,216 


23 


■ 4,760 


4,704 : 


5,712 


30 


I 4,480 


4,704 : 


5,247 


April total 


25.278 


27,104 


30,637 


May 7 


" 3,696 


3,864 ■ 


4,256 


14 


. . ; 2,856 


2,9 68 | 


3,136 


21« f • • 


, 2,576 


2.296 


2,912 


Total August 1 to May' 21.. 


: 283,397 


308,538' j 


325,074 


Agricultural Attache C. C. 


Taylor, London. 






BUTTER: Aastralian grading, 1936- 


•37 season to May 8, 




with comparisons 






Date 


j 1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Week ended 


: 1,000 pounds 


1,000 pounds 


' 1,000 pounds 


July 1 to January 30 


. : 182,750 


153 , 564 


111,344 


July 1 to February 27 


i H 


179,053 


132,602 


March 6 


; 4 


4,601 


5,398 


13 


! % 


4,027 


4,995 


20 


a/ 


3,799 


4,329 


27 


' a/ 


3,774 


4,400 


March total 


"i 4 ' 


16,201 


19 , 122 


April 3 


! % 


3,761 


4,178 


10 


: §./ 

j f 


2,733 


4,200 


17 


3,076 


3,644 


24 




2,701 


3,223 


April total 


i % 

i H ■ 


12,271 


15 , 245 


May 1 


: a/ 


2,222 


2,444 


8 


i a/ 


1,557 


2,554 


Total July 1 to May 8, ... . . 


• b/ 182,750 


211,304 


171,967 



Weekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Committee, a/ Not available, 
b/ Total to January 30. Later statistics not available. 



June 7, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



315 



EXCHANGE BATES : Average weekly and monthly values in New York of 

specified curren cies, May 29, 1937, with comparisons a/ 

Month Week ended 

Monetary 



Country 



Unit 



Argentina. . . 

Canada 

China '. 

Denmark 

England 

France ...... 

Germany 

Italy....... 

Japan. ...... 

Mexico 

Netherlands. 

Norway 

Sweden 

Switzerland 



Paper peso 
Dollar. . . 
Shang, yu 
Krone .... 
Pound. . . . 
Franc . . . . 
Beichsmark 
Xj XX* ci • • • • • 

Yen. . 

Peso 

Guilder. . 
Kr o ne . . . . 
Krona. . . . 
Franc. . . . 



?35 



1956 



Apr. 



Cents 

32.22! 
99.53; 
38.79 
21.59 
483.68 

6. 60, 
40.26| 

8.28; 
28.37 
27.94' 
67.46 : 
24. 3 0: 
24.93 
32.36 



Apr. 



Cents 

32. 95 
99.50* 
29.73: 
22.06; 
494.27? 

6.59 
40.24: 

7.89 
28.87; 
27.77i 
67.89 
24.83; 
25.48 
32.58 



.937 



1937 



Fee. 


: Mar . : 


Apr. ; 


May 
15 


May 
• 22 


May 
29 


Cents 


Cents ; 


Cents • 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cent ^ 


32 . 63 


32 575 


3? 77 


3? 93 


'xo 94 


32 94 


99.9 5 


100 05: 


100 12" 


100. 20 


100. 11 


100.08 


29. 60 


29 . 66: 


29 . 7! : 


29.81 


29 « 79 


29. 79 


21.85 


21.81: 


21.94;' 


22.05 


22.06 


22.05 


489.39 


488.51: 


491. 63| 


494,04 


494.23 


494.07 


4.66 


4.59; 


4.50 


4.48 


4.47 


4.47 


40.23 


40.22; 


40.21| 


40.15 


40.13 


40.14 


5.26 


5 . 26; 


5.26; 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


23.53 


28.49; 


28.64 


28.78 


23.79 


28.78 


27.75 


27 . 75: 


27.73 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


54.69 


54.70: 


54.76 


54.95 


54.97 


54.98 


24.59 


24.54: 


2.4. 70 


24.82 


24.83 


24.82 


25.25 


25.19: 


25.34: 


25.47 


25.48 


25.47 


22.83 


22 . 79: 


22.79; 


22.88 


22.86 


22.85 



Federal Reserve Board, a/ Noon "buying rates for cable transfers. 



LIVESTOCK AND MEAT: Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets, 



" z — - 

Market and item 




Week ended 




May 27 


May 19 


> May 26 


— — — 1 , , 


Dollars 


Dplj,ars 


Dollars 


Germany: 










17.70 


16.79 


16.79 




11.45 


13.31 


13.69 


United Kingdom: p_/ 








Prices at Liverpool first qua.lity - 










Nominal 


17.10 


17.10 




19.36 


20.96 


20.85 




17.13 


18.48 : 


17.65 




21.62 


20. 96 


20.96 


American refined lard 


11.63 


15 • 28 


15.15 



Liverpool quotations are on the basis of sale from importer to wholesaler, 
a/ Converted at current rate of exchange. p_/ Week ended Friday. 



316 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 23 



Index 



Late cables, 



Page 
309 



Apples, crop prospects, 

Nova Scotia, 1937 311 

Avocados: 

Crop conditions, Cuba, 1937 312 



Export prospects, Cuoa, 1937 
Batter : 
Gradings: 

Australia, May 8, 1937 

Hew Zealand, May 21, 1937. 
•Prices, specified markets, 

June 3," 1937 

Cotton* prices, U. E., 

May 28, 1937 

Excnange rates, foreign, 

May 29, 1937 



312 



314 

314 



313 
313 
315 



Page 

Flaxseed: 

Area, India, 1936,1937 309 

Production, India, 1936,1937 309 

Pineaoules: 

Exports, Cuba, 1935-1986 311 

Production, Cuba, 1935,1937 311 

Pork, prices, foreign markets, 

May 26, 1937 315 

Prunes: 

Crop prospects, 

Yugoslavia, 1937 312 

Production, specified 

countries, 1935,1936 3l| 

Wheat: 

Area, India, 1936,1937 309 

Production, India, 1936,1937 309 

Quota payments, II. K. , 

1932ll937 310 



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